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Beverley Area Walks

The table below contains information on all walks centred in the beverley area. Click on any walk's name or reference code to see more details on the walk, including photos and a route map.

 

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Beverley to Cherry Burton Station Stroll
Summary
Walk Name
Beverley to Cherry Burton Station Stroll
Ref
C2
Identify wild flowers and trees as you walk along a section of the disused Beverley to Market Weighton railway line, now known as the 'Hudson Way'.
Details
Circular Walk
Yes
Grade
Easy
Walk Type
  • Easy Walks
Ordnance Survey Explorer Map
293
Car Parking Facility
Roadside parking at Cherry Burton Station. Formal parking at Pighill Crossing in Molescroft (off Grange Way). Please park responsibly and courteously
Refreshments
Pubs and shops in Beverley
Public Conveniences
Various sites in Beverley
Distance
Distance (Miles)
5
Distance (Kilometres)
8
Description
  • The start of your walk is at Pighill Car park, Molescroft, which is approximately 1½ miles from Beverley town centre.  The area is intensively farmed, mainly for winter wheat and barley, but the bright yellow flowers of oil seed rape will occasionally add a splash of colour to the landscape in early summer.
  • The banks of the former railway line have regenerated with wild flowers, shrubs and trees.  Look out for primroses, violets, celandines and bluebells in spring.  The most common trees and saplings are ash and hawthorn, interspersed with oak.
  • Simply walk in a straight line, using the map as your guide.
Map(s)
Location
Start Point
Pighill Crossing in Molescroft
End Point
Cherry Burton Station
Towns & Villages
Beverley, Cherry Burton, Etton and Leconfield
ParishMolescroft
Start Easting
502,813.00
Start Northing
441,388.00
End Easting
499,266.00
End Northing
442,716.00
Further Information
Features of Interest
• To the north of the start point you will see the former R.A.F. Leconfield, which was one of many airfields built in the mid-1930s.  The first aeroplanes to use the base were Heyford biplanes in 1937, but with the start of WWII war various squadrons of Spitfires and Hurricanes were stationed there.  Towards the end of the war bomber squadrons of Blenheims and Halifaxs arrived.  At the end of the war the station became the Central Gunnery School which, after 10 years, developed into the Fighter
Accessibility Information
This route:- 
 
• is relatively flat. 
 
• does not contain barriers. 
Additional Information
 
• When you reach the end of the route, turn around and retrace your steps back to the start.