[Skip to content]

.

Goole and Howdenshire Area Walks

The table below contains information on all walks centred in the goole and howdenshire area. Click on any walk's name or reference code to see more details on the walk, including photos and a route map.

 

Return to the Find Walks page

 

A Stroll from Rawcliffe
Summary
Walk Name
A Stroll From Rawcliffe
Ref
W14
Walk along the bank of the river Aire and visit the historic village of Rawcliffe.
Details
Circular Walk
Yes
Grade
Easy
Walk Type
  • Easy Walks
Ordnance Survey Explorer Map
291
Car Parking Facility
Roadside parking in Rawcliffe
Refreshments
Pubs and shops in Rawcliffe
Public Conveniences
Estcourt Street in Goole
Distance
Distance (Miles)
2
Distance (Kilometres)
3
Description
  • On this walk you pass by the cottages and friendly riverside inn of Rawcliffe.  You then follow the bank top of the gently-flowing river Aire.
  • Dominating the skyline is the massive Drax power station, western Europe's largest coal-fired power station.
  • On the walk you leave the river near a small pond and follow a track back to the village.  Several of the village inns offer good food and hospitality.
Map(s)
Location
Start Point
Rawcliffe
End Point
Rawcliffe
Towns & Villages
Rawcliffe
ParishRawcliffe
Start Easting
468,610.00
Start Northing
423,032.00
End Easting
468,610.00
End Northing
423,032.00
Further Information
Features of Interest
-  Rawcliffe was once a thriving little riverside port on the river Aire, on the main road from Hull and Goole to the west.  Nowadays, with river traffic using the Aire and Calder canal and motor traffic using the M62, Rawcliffe has reverted back to a pleasant village.  It has a large village green bordered with fine chestnut trees. 
 
-  In the churchyard of St. James, re-built in 1842 in the early English style, is the grave of "Jemmy Hirst", a local eccentric from the days of George III.  His favourite sports were hunting on his pet bull and shooting with his dog and pig! 
Accessibility Information
This route:- 
 
-  is relatively flat. 
 
-  contains a mixture of stiles and gates. 
 
-  may involve walking through fields with livestock. 
Additional Information
-  At Drax power station, reject heat is used to grow some 300,000 tomato plants with a crop of 3,500 tonnes a year (3% of the home market).  The massive chimney, containing three separate flues, is 850-feet (258-metres) high and dominates the countryside for miles around.  Each year the Drax site produces 22,000 million units of electricity and burns 10-12 million tonnes of local coal, an amount that would cover the three lanes of the M1 between Leeds and London to a depth of 8 feet.