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Goole and Howdenshire Area Walks

The table below contains information on all walks centred in the goole and howdenshire area. Click on any walk's name or reference code to see more details on the walk, including photos and a route map.

 

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W27 - A Stroll from Goole
Summary
Walk Name
A Stroll from Goole
Ref
W27
Enjoy a stroll along river banks and pass under three contrasting bridges.
Details
Circular Walk
Yes
Grade
Moderate
Ordnance Survey Explorer Map
291
Car Parking Facility
Estcourt Street car park in Goole
Refreshments
Pubs and shops in Goole
Public Conveniences
Estcourt Street car park and various sites in Goole
Distance
Distance (Miles)
7
Distance (Kilometres)
11
Description
  • Walk from the clock tower in the centre of Goole and head off along Boothferry Road through the pedestrian shopping centre.
  • At the end of Boothferry Road turn right, pass along Airmyn Road and pass over the M62.
  • Next turn immediately left to descend to a surfaced path leading to Airmyn village, and to the main street and the bank of the river Aire.
  • From there on follow the floodbank of the Aire, then the Ouse, under the old Boothferry Bridge, the M62 bridge and the railway bridge on the approach to Goole.
  • On arrival at Victoria Pier, return to the start in Goole town centre by walking along Victoria Street.
Map(s)
Location
Start Point
Goole
End Point
Goole
Towns & Villages
Airmyn, Goole and Hook
ParishGoole
Start Easting
474,615.00
Start Northing
423,597.00
End Easting
474,615.00
End Northing
423,597.00
Further Information
Features of Interest
-  On your walk you will see three contrasting bridges: the old railway bridge installed in 1929, the soaring modern M62 motorway and the bridge carrying the railway to Goole Station. 
 
-  Before 1929, the first crossing of the Humber and the Ouse was the toll bridge in Selby, ten miles upstream from Goole.  There was a ferry crossing at Booth, hence the name 'Boothferry'. 
 
-  The river Ouse was once the main waterway to York (Eboracum) for the Romans.  The Vikings then used it as their route into Yorvik, as they called it. 
Accessibility Information
This route:- 
 
-  is relatively flat, except for the bridge over    the M62. 
 
-  contains kissing gates and hand gates. 
 
-  contains steps and/or stiles. 
 
-  crosses at least one road. 
Additional Information
-  Goole is unique.  It was created by the Aire & Calder Navigation Company to be the port for their new canal.  There was no Goole until building started in 1823.  It became one of the busiest ports in the country, as well as being the furthest from the sea. 
 
-  Our main route runs for seven miles along riverbanks and through Goole town centre.  Follow the other paths/routes shown on the map in red to shorten or lengthen your walk.